Rediscovered Luwian Hieroglyphic Inscriptions from Western Asia Minor

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cquiles
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Rediscovered Luwian Hieroglyphic Inscriptions from Western Asia Minor

Post by cquiles » Sat Dec 23, 2017 8:07 am

Rediscovered Luwian Hieroglyphic Inscriptions from Western Asia Minor, by Eberhard Zangger and Fred Woudhuizen, TALANTA – Proceedings of the Dutch Archaeological and Historic Society, Vol. 50, pp 9-56, 2018.

Abstract:
The estate of the British prehistorian James Mellaart (1925–2012) contained Mellaart’s tracing of several Luwian hieroglyphic inscriptions, including a particular prominent one that was originally drawn by the French archaeologist Georges Perrot in 1878. In search of building materials, peasants in the village of Beyköy, approximately 34 kilometers north of Afyonkarahisar in western Turkey, had retrieved a number of stones from the ground. Together they make up a frieze 29 meters in length and about 35 centimeters in height. Not yet able to read the symbols, Perrot drew the stones in the wrong sequence. After Perrot had recorded the inscription, the villagers installed the stones into the foundation of a newly-built mosque. When Luwian hieroglyphic was deciphered, Perrot’s drawing was meant to be published within the framework of a joint Turkish/US-American research project focusing on thus far unpublished documents that had come into the possession of the Ottoman government during the 19th century. The Turkish archaeologist Uluğ Bahadır Alkım produced a preliminary interpretation of the contents and established the correct sequence of the stones shortly before he died in 1981. – The Beyköy inscription contains 50 phrases and is thus the longest known Bronze Age hieroglyphic document. It outranks by far any documents known from western Anatolia. The inscription was commissioned by great king Kupantakuruntas of Mira. It commemorates his deeds, and in so doing provides a detailed account of his realm and conquests. The text dates back to the upheavals of the Sea Peoples, ca. 1190–1180 BC. It relates the maritime conquests in the eastern Mediterranean under the command of great prince Muksus from the Troad. The western Anatolian naval forces proceeded all the way to Ashkelon in southern Palestine, bordering on Egypt. The memory of this endeavor was preserved in Greek literary tradition in the form of the legendary tales about Mopsos. In short, the Luwian hieroglyphic text from Beyköy gives us a fascinating insight into the history of a region and a period which has thus far been shrouded in darkness. It is reproduced and discussed here together with three more substantial Luwian hieroglyphic documents and four fragments from Mellaart’s estate.
Carlos Quiles - Academia Prisca

cquiles
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Re: Rediscovered Luwian Hieroglyphic Inscriptions from Western Asia Minor

Post by cquiles » Sun Jan 21, 2018 4:28 pm

From the co-author of the text, Fred Woudhuizen:

The recently discovered Luwian Hieroglyphic inscription from Tel Ahmar
A fairly well-preserved Luwian hieroglyphic inscription recently discovered near Tell Ahmar, along the eastern bank of the Euphrates in present-day Syria, commemorates a military campaign by king Hamiatas of Masuwari, presumably into the region of the Balikh valley sometime during the late 10th or early 9th century BC. As the text further reveals, out of gratitude Hamiatas established a cult for his chief protective deity, Tarhunt of the Army, the regulations of which are specified in detail. The treatment of this text is followed by an appendix with an overview of the external evidence on the reading of the Luwian hiero-glyphic signs *376 and *377.
Some suggestions as to the improvement of our understanding of the contents of the recently discovered Luwian Hieroglyphic text Aleppo 6*
This note offers a few suggestions for improving the reading and understanding of the Luwian hiero-glyphic text Aleppo 6, discovered in the temple of the Storm God in the eponymous city in 2003 and first published by J.D. Hawkins.
Carlos Quiles - Academia Prisca

cquiles
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On the potential Mellaart's forgery of the Luwian documents

Post by cquiles » Thu Mar 15, 2018 5:15 pm

The concerns about the potential forgery of these documents began long ago, ignited by previous known forgeries by Mellaart, and it was answered by Fred Woudhuizen.

As far as I know, the recent news come from the investigation led by the very authors of the study, including Eberhard Zangger at Luwian Studies:British prehistorian forged documents throughout his life

Interview with Eberhard Zangger about the Spiegel article “Schrumpliger Luftballon” (“wrinkled balloon”)

An article on the same topic was published by LiveScience: Famed Archaeologist 'Discovered' His Own Fakes at 9,000-Year-Old Settlement

I would say that, for the moment, not trusting the authenticity of the documents is the safest path for researchers...
Carlos Quiles - Academia Prisca

Bonnie45
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Re: Rediscovered Luwian Hieroglyphic Inscriptions from Western Asia Minor

Post by Bonnie45 » Mon May 28, 2018 7:39 am

According to this inscription, the Luwians from western Asia Minor contributed decisively to the so-called Sea Peoples' invasions and thus to the end of the Bronze Age in the eastern Mediterranean.

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